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California Wildfires


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#1
weathergeek87

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Perfect storm set up for this.
Trump brings up a point and I want to see if I can get some input from you guys.
RE: the cali tree huggers and leaving the forests untouched, does that lead to issues where dead trees are just left to rot? Further enhancing wildfires? Not trying to make this political but just wondering; could something be done in terms of allocating funds better which may in the future prevent smaller/moderate sized fires from becoming monstrous?
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#2
gpsnavigator

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 weathergeek87, on 11 November 2018 - 04:49 PM, said:

Perfect storm set up for this.
Trump brings up a point and I want to see if I can get some input from you guys.
RE: the cali tree huggers and leaving the forests untouched, does that lead to issues where dead trees are just left to rot? Further enhancing wildfires? Not trying to make this political but just wondering; could something be done in terms of allocating funds better which may in the future prevent smaller/moderate sized fires from becoming monstrous?

The issue of forest management should be looked at, as should the impact of urban sprawl, droughts, and climate change. I'm not aware of anyone advocating for leaving dead rot around, but then again, I don't live in California. As far as funding, the forestry service needs better funding and oversight. We can spend trillions on tanks and wars, but can't address important environmental concerns here in our own country, and in the political climate today, the can will continue to get kicked down the road. Progressives would rather scream over cultural issues, and the President would rather go on uninformed rants than do anything helpful. So lack of action on this problem is political and that cannot be overstated.
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#3
weathergeek87

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 gpsnavigator, on 11 November 2018 - 08:56 PM, said:



The issue of forest management should be looked at, as should the impact of urban sprawl, droughts, and climate change. I'm not aware of anyone advocating for leaving dead rot around, but then again, I don't live in California. As far as funding, the forestry service needs better funding and oversight. We can spend trillions on tanks and wars, but can't address important environmental concerns here in our own country, and in the political climate today, the can will continue to get kicked down the road. Progressives would rather scream over cultural issues, and the President would rather go on uninformed rants than do anything helpful. So lack of action on this problem is political and that cannot be overstated.

In terms of climate change, it's hard to really pinpoint how to fix this.
California is feast or famine in terms of weather. Seems like in the last 8 years it's either no rain at all or flooding. There is literally no inbetween out there. Was there ever an actual inbetween though? Are the fires getting worse with time?
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#4
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In some parts of California, fires can recur in areas with histories of fires. Examples of this are in Oakland, where fires of various size and ignition occurred in 1923, 1931, 1933, 1937, 1946, 1955, 1960, 1961, 1968, 1970, 1980, 1990, 1991, 1995, 2002, and 2008.[101][102] Other examples being Orange County, Riverside County, San Bernardino County, and Los Angeles County. In the case of Orange and San Bernardino, these two counties share a county border that runs north to south through the Chino Hills State Park, with the park's landscape ranging from large green coastal sage scrub, grassland, and woodland, to areas of brown sparsely dense vegetation made drier by droughts or hot summers. The valley's grass and barren land can become easily susceptible to dry spells and drought, therefore making it a prime spot for brush fires and conflagration, many of which have occurred since 1914. Hills and canyons have seen brush or wildfires in 1914, the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and into today.[103]

On occasion, freak lightning strikes from thunderstorms may also spark wildfires in areas that have seen past ignition. Examples of this are the 1999 Megram Fire and the 2008 California wildfires.


....
MAYbe they just happen, always have, always will.
like building million dollar mansions on the ocean, perhaps some areas need not be built on.
more population and structures equate to more MSM coverage and pushing blame.
calis 5/6th largest (acre wise) was in 1932.
natural disasters happen. always have, always will
they are only seem "more severe" now because of population density.

not sure how many trees are cedar type but man they are like gasoline in how they combust.

thought cali wants to secede? now they want help?
maybe putting moneys to illegals shouldn't be priority?





#5
gpsnavigator

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 weathergeek87, on 11 November 2018 - 11:05 PM, said:

In terms of climate change, it's hard to really pinpoint how to fix this.
California is feast or famine in terms of weather. Seems like in the last 8 years it's either no rain at all or flooding. There is literally no inbetween out there. Was there ever an actual inbetween though? Are the fires getting worse with time?
There is evidence to suggest the dry seasons are becoming drier, longer, and hotter. Fire season is typically ending by now out there, and yet new fires have sprung up just today. The state is devastated with loss of life. I realize it's hard to pin one fire on climate change (similar to the way you can't necessarily pin one hurricane on it either). But the facts are warmer, drier, and hotter weather overall, in which California and much of the west have seen in the past couple of decades. And the negative cycle perpetuates. Drier ground means less evaporation to form clouds. And when it does rain, there is now less forest to control runoff and absorb the moisture.

I agree, fixing climate change is not easy (or even possible at this point). But that shouldn't be an excuse for inaction, as there is a chance to at least mitigate the damage somewhat and limit temperature rise and the most devastating effects. But since all sides of our politics seemed marred in a debate absent of any actual science, I'm not sure what it will take to get us there. I guess for the political left, we're going to have to tie climate change to women and the LGBTQ community somehow, and for the right, we're going to have to sell the potential for huge profits to be made in alternatives (and perhaps well-reformed nuclear power too).

Clearly, we aren't there yet. :)
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#6
vascudave

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 gpsnavigator, on 12 November 2018 - 06:16 PM, said:


There is evidence to suggest the dry seasons are becoming drier, longer, and hotter. Fire season is typically ending by now out there, and yet new fires have sprung up just today. The state is devastated with loss of life. I realize it's hard to pin one fire on climate change (similar to the way you can't necessarily pin one hurricane on it either). But the facts are warmer, drier, and hotter weather overall, in which California and much of the west have seen in the past couple of decades. And the negative cycle perpetuates. Drier ground means less evaporation to form clouds. And when it does rain, there is now less forest to control runoff and absorb the moisture.

I agree, fixing climate change is not easy (or even possible at this point). But that shouldn't be an excuse for inaction, as there is a chance to at least mitigate the damage somewhat and limit temperature rise and the most devastating effects. But since all sides of our politics seemed marred in a debate absent of any actual science, I'm not sure what it will take to get us there. I guess for the political left, we're going to have to tie climate change to women and the LGBTQ community somehow, and for the right, we're going to have to sell the potential for huge profits to be made in alternatives (and perhaps well-reformed nuclear power too).

Clearly, we aren't there yet. :)/>
IN terms of profits we can ask gore





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